Oil increases despite fears of a worldwide economic downturn

Published:

On: Aug 2019

Oil prices increased despite concerns related to a worldwide economic slumped as well the ongoing United States of America trade war, which has decreased demand for material such as crude. As per the latest report, International benchmark Brent crude futures were seemed at $58.75 a barrel, rose 22 cents from their last settlement.

The United States of America West Texas Intermediate(WTI) futures were reached at $55.10 per barrel, increase 60 cents from their previous end. It is reported that both benchmarks had dropped down earlier in the day, while Brent capturing a session slower of $57.88 and WTI hitting a session low of about $53.54.

The executive director of energy research at Standard Chartered, Emily Ashford told that, “What we have observed now is a distinctive perception of risk across different geographies.” But, the money feedbacks during the trading of Asia or London are unexpectedly reverse during the United States of America trading. And, the price looked out to be succeeding that pattern recently.”

Basically, the 3rd quarter is one of the strongest season for oil demand because the drivers put the roads for holidays of summer, but the ongoing trade war between the United States of America and China has decreased the demand and meanwhile, badly pressured oil prices.

As we reported earlier, the United States of America president, Donald Trump stated that he was not ready to make any deal with China and also called a month of September round of trade talks into big question.

Ifo economic institute of Germany reported based on its quarterly survey of about 1,200 analysts over 110 nations recorded that its current conditions measures as well as economic expectations have declined in the third quarter.

Furthermore, the oil minister of Kuwait, Khaled al-Fadhel told that fears of a worldwide economic slowdown were overstressed and the demand for the worldwide crude oil raised in the second half, indicating to diminish inventories of oil.